Friday, June 19, 2015

The Start of Leg 2: Surreal Times in Sydney, Australia

What the earth looks like between
Auckland and Sydney.
I flew into Sydney, Australia from Auckland on my birthday, June 14. When I got off the plane and came out of customs there was a camera crew waiting with my friend Kate standing behind them. When Kate told me she was going to try to get some publicity for my trip, I thought she had gone way overboard. Three cameras were pointing at me with their spotlights on. My World Piece project may be noble but it's not that newsworthy. I walked past them and their lenses did not follow me. Kate and I had a huge laugh when we saw that right behind me was the famous Australian rugby player, Jarryd Hayne, who was just flying in from California where he now plays NFL football for the San Francisco 49ers, and all the cameras rushed toward him. Phew!

Kate took me for a long walk around the city on my first day there. We walked straight into a pie shop! Called Harry's Cafe de Wheels, this famous place is a Sydney institution, around since the 1940s. Probably one of the first food carts -- long before they became popular -- Harry's sits on the waterfront of a wharf where military ships dock. No wonder they've been so successful -- they serve the ultimate comfort food: meat pies topped with mashed peas, mashed potatoes, and gravy.

Barbra Streisand is on the wall of fame. I made a lemon meringue pie for her once,
when I worked at Mary's Kitchen in Malibu.

Sailors aren't the only ones
who appreciate comfort food.

The next day was a busy one. Kate goes to work by ferry and I joined her on her morning commute. A ferry ride on a sunny morning is the ultimate way to see Sydney Harbor -- or Harbour, as they spell it. This kind of transport would almost make me want a full-time job in the city. Almost.
Commuting with Kate. You know you're in Sydney
when you see the iconic Opera House.
I left Kate at her office and walked a few blocks over for a meeting with Sam Cawthorn, an author, amputee and motivational speaker. He is someone Grace in New Zealand thought I should meet, because he is an inspirational figure, so she sent me his contact details. Because I want to meet all the inspirational people I can, I contacted him -- and I asked him if he'd like to meet for pie. (Does one need any bigger agenda than just eating pie?)
Australia is such a fun & happy place, even the pie is smiling!

So Sam and I met, and talked, and ate pie for breakfast. Steak and Mushroom pie at Pie Face, an Australian pie shop chain that expanded to the US and now is fighting to survive a bankruptcy filing. But that's not relevant as their doors are still open and their smiley pies are still good. 

Sam asked me about World Piece. I explained my mission, which I might have been downplaying a little bit as it prompted him to quote Marianne Williamson, pounding his chest as he spoke -- 

Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn't serve the world. There's nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we're liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.

-- and then he told me I needed to shoot more video for my social media sites and made me promise that I would do that because it would make me more successful. Hmmm...well, I still like my still photos and writing essays. He told me how much he loves what he does, and then we said goodbye. I'm not sure which was fuller afterward, my belly or my head.

But the day got even more "Dreamtime" after that. (Had to throw in an Aborginal term since I'm in Australia.) First the ferry ride, then the smiling steak pie and pep talk, and then....lunch with the former prime minister of Australia, John Howard! Where am I and how did I end up here?!?!  

It was the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta. Kate's parents had been invited to a luncheon and had two extra places -- for Kate and little ol' American me. I had to laugh because it was the ultimate cultural experience, a window into an octogenarian underworld as the lunch was hosted by the English Speaking Society and some other organization that might as well have been called Save the Monarchy. I could be a neutral observer and marvel at the different ways in which people view the world -- or how they think the world should work, still work after all several centuries. Whether Australia is part of the Commonwealth or an independent republic, it's a really great country and I feel really excited/lucky/privileged to be here and experience it -- even if just for 10 days. 

The funniest part -- well, maybe not funny because it forces me to admit my lack of knowledge of world history -- is that I had to Google "Magna Carta." It is basically a charter of liberty, the first document to declare that no one in society, not even a king or a queen -- is above the law.

No free man shall be taken or imprisoned, or dispossessed or outlawed or exiled or in any way ruined, nor will we go or send against him except by the lawful judgement of his peers or by the law of the land.

Good to learn something "new." That's why it's good to travel. You can fill in the missing pieces of your education, while dining on a lunch of grilled salmon and lemon tart with dignitaries and well-dressed white-haired ladies.
My dad's name is also John Howard.
Though apparently no relation. I wonder if
this John Howard likes pie as much as my dad.

My next post -- if I can keep up with my blog -- will be about my presentation at the Sydney Women's International Club.  So check back soon. There's more to come. More pie, more people, more countries. 

Only two and a half weeks into it, the World Piece journey has been a great, fulfilling -- and mind-opening -- adventure so far. Thanks for following along! I'm posting daily on Facebook -- and you don't need to be signed up for FB to read it -- so check there for updates in the meantime. https://www.facebook.com/TheWorldNeedsMorePie


Tuesday, June 16, 2015

First Pie Class of the World Piece Journey: New Zealand

My first pie class of the World Piece tour was in Napier, New Zealand. Brett Zimmerman (aka Mr. Z), a friend of Louise Watts (my host Grace's daughter), is a cooking teacher at a local college. (College in NZ is high school in US terms.)

Mr. Z offered use of his classroom -- 6 large stainless steel tables and seven -- seven!! -- ovens. YES! PERFECT! THANK YOU!

The first thing we did was go shopping for pie tins. There is a restaurant supply warehouse just 2 blocks from the school. And luckily they had pie tins. The only kind they had were "very deep dish" but I didn't mind. We had plenty of apples to fill them. My pie mentor Mary Spellman taught me to make pie in generous portions: "Don't be stingy," she always said if I put too little filling in a pie dish. Besides, America has a reputation of doing thing BIG. So big pies were what we would make.

Meet Mr. Z. He is not just a cooking teacher, he's also a rugby coach.
This is what the classroom looked like before we made a mess.
Pastry gems are some mysterious cross between butter & shortening.
Seemed ideal, and the price was right (FREE!), but the texture was hard.
As for the taste, it was okay, but I wouldn't recommend the stuff.
Gorgeous apples from The Yummy Fruit Company.
From left to right: Ballaret, Granny Smith, Lemonade.
Lemonade is a new variety, a cross between Gala & Braeburn.
Ballaret are tarter than Gr Smith & easier to peel. Perfect for pie!

Before the class, Mr. Z used some of the apples to give me a lesson in knife-handling skills. We carved swans. He had worked in some fancy pants restaurant and they made these as a garnish, not to eat. He said he worked 14-hour days at that job. No wonder his days were so long! It takes a lot of time to create these carvings. It was fun to learn, but I prefer using apples for pie.

Swan in progress.

Not bad for my first (and last) attempt.
Luckily I did not slice my fingers
 off in the knife-handling exercise.
Especially since this was only
 the beginning of my trip.
Pie is always better with butter. I came to the right country as
New Zealand makes really good butter. 
We had about 18 students for the class. (I didn't actually count them, Grace did, but I think the number was more like 16 because she included me and Mr. Z in the headcount.) Participants ranged in age from 17 to 70. Mr. Z had sent out email invitations to the school administrators, his cooking students, his catering business helpers, and a few local Hawke's Bay friends. 

Neil, one of the first participants to arrive.
Check out those pants! A patchwork extravaganza,
he told me they're 20 years old. 

This cutie pie is Sam. She showed up in braids and someone asked her if she was the Pie Lady.
I wanted my pic taken with her since, based on our matching hairstyles,
we were obviously kindred spirits.

And there is it, the teacher's corner. More like "Show & Tell."

No matter where in the world I teach a pie class, it is pretty much always the same format. Introduction, overview of what we're going to do, demo, turn everyone loose, and then watch the flour fly.



The Pitchfork Pie Stand lives on in every pie I make!

"Rolling dough is like horseback riding, you have to take control of the reins."
Yep, that analogy works in pretty much every country.


These are some of Mr. Z's students. They love baking.

Mr. Crazy Patchwork Pants and Miss Cutie Pie Braids. They were a great team!

This table of ladies includes a florist, a school nurse, and a librarian.
They made the most beautifully decorated pies.

My host, Grace Bower, was clearly having a great time. She is not only an
excellent knitter of prayer shawls, she also is an excellent pie maker.

This is Mona. She's a food judge. But this night she was on the other side of the table.

A crimping lesson.
Neil had to leave early so he took his unbaked pie home with him. On his bike. He had to ride one-handed. In the dark. I never did hear if the pie made it or not. I'm pretty sure no news is good news. I had to hand it to him for his adventurous can-do Kiwi spirit.


The culinary students went to extra lengths to make their pies pretty.
Not for extra credit, but because they enjoyed the artistic process.

Making progress. 

The first pie to come out of the oven belonged to Mona the food judge.
Her pie could have won any pie contest.
I wore my running shoes for the class. I know from having used classroom kitchens before that when you have multiple ovens dispersed through the large room it is a real workout to move between the tables and around the people (dodging rolling pins and trying not to slip on the pie dough that's fallen on the floor) to get to the ovens. You don't want your students to do all that work preparing the pies only to have them burn!

I couldn't read the dials on Mr. Z's ovens as the numbers were worn off. They were in celsius so I couldn't understand them anyway. But thanks to my sprinting and squats and the effort of rotating pies around on the oven shelves, every single pie came out looking....well, YUMMY.

See? No pies were harmed (or burned) in the making of this film.

After all these years and all these oven burns, pie still makes me happy. 

Louise Watts presents the "Apple Award" to Mr. Z. The hand-blown glass artwork
came from Utah and Grace determined that people who have contributed something good
should be bestowed with the award--or at least have their picture taken with the apple.


Every pie class ends with a "Victory Shot." This one was no exception. Look at all those happy people. And look at all those gorgeous pies! Pie really does make the world a better place.

And to think is only the first class of the three-month, 10-country, round-the-world journey. Here's to many more pies and many more happy people.

Thank you, New Zealand -- Grace Bower, Louise Watts, Brett "Mr. Z" Zimmerman & the William Colonso College, Paul Paynter & the Yummy Fruit Company, the Ibis & Novotel Hotels in Rotorua, and many others -- for making the first leg of World Piece a fun, safe and successful one.

Next stop: Australia (June 14 to 24)


RETURN TO THE WORLD NEEDS MORE PIE WEBSITE

Monday, June 15, 2015

Mad Apples at The Yummy Fruit Company

Here's a lesson in trust. For most of my stops on the World Piece tour I have quite a few things planned, scheduled and confirmed on the calendar. For New Zealand, however, my first stop of my three-month journey, I left things a bit, shall we say, loose. I knew I wanted to teach a pie class. And because it's New Zealand, home to the Granny Smith apple -- the apple of choice I use for my pies -- I knew I wanted to visit an orchard where these beauties are grown.

I love seeing how things come together.

My NZ contact, Grace, has a daughter, Louise, who lives in the Hawke's Bay region, the largest apple growing region in the country. (The area is also famous for my other favorite horticultural product: wine.) Grace told Louise the "American pie lady" was coming to visit and asked if she could organize a tour of an orchard. Louise happened to be grocery shopping one afternoon a few days before my arrival and saw a truck parked outside. It had a company name painted on the door: Johnny Appleseed. It was a local apple grower.

Louise approached the man getting into his truck and told him about me and my request. (Go, Louise!) His name was Terrence, lo and behold he was the operations manager of the orchard (life is magical that way), he gave her his card, and after Louise passed his info on to me I emailed him.

After an initial exchange I then received an email from the company CEO, Paul Paynter, who offered to conduct a tour himself. He wrote, "We are completely snowed right now, so I don't have a lot of time, but you are mad enough that I want to meet you." (Mad as in crazy.) "The world needs more mad people."

And that's how I came to get a tour of The Yummy Fruit Company orchards.

Ushered into the boardroom, I was greeted by a tableful of apples -- and a man wielding a knife.

The man with the knife turned out to be company chief, Paul Paynter himself. He introduced us to some of his favorite apple varieties with cute names like Ballaret, Lemonade, Ambrosia, Braeburn, Pacific Queen, Sweet Tango, Smitten -- and of course the one with which I am intimately familiar after making thousands of pies with them: Granny Smith.
Paul gave us a tour of his orchards (they have 1700 acres), apologizing for the fact there wasn't much to see given it is currently winter in the southern hemisphere. The Yummy Fruit Company is a family owned business and Paul is its third generation to run it.


We drove past the Granny Smith section and I asked him if he planted those New Zealand sheep there just for me, as a prop to make the place look more, well, more New Zealandish. No, he said, they serve a purpose. They eat some of the leftover apples off the ground and their feet (hooves) stomp the leaves turning it to mulch.


Paul's grandfather changed the company name from Paynter to Johnny Appleseed to convey a more all-encompassing side of their product.


Harvest was several months ago, but there were still apples on some of the trees.


Do you see the pink spot on the trunk of the tree above?  It is marked to be cut down. Paul has a test plot where he is experimenting, trying to create and grow new varieties. He walks through and takes bites out of them and spits them out, like wine tasters do. The trees with apples that don't measure up to his taste get the axe to make room for new and different trees until he comes up with a new variety --and taste -- that he likes and thinks he can market.


Paul says the world needs more "mad" people like me. I think the world needs more "mad" people like him. So we were in agreement on that. He is passionate about his work, he loves his apples and cares for them like their his family -- and really, they are his family since his grandfather started the business and the company is run out of his grandparents old house. (The boardroom pictures is the old dining room.) Meeting Paul and spending an afternoon tasting apples was a highlight of my stay in New Zealand.

In the true spirit of pie -- and by that I mean generosity -- Paul gave us three cases of apples to use for my first pie class on the World Piece tour, which I was teaching the next day. We ended up using all of them and they were, just like the box says, absolutely yummy.


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Monday, June 8, 2015

A Few New Zealand Pie Recipes

New Zealand gas stations don't just sell fuel for cars.
The pie display the BP gas station -- or petrol station as they say in NZ.


If there is one thing I've learned on my World Piece journey so far, it's that New Zealand loves pie. Kiwis (as New Zealanders are affectionately called) love pie so much it's sold at every gas station, convenience store, just about everywhere you look. Some consider it a staple and often eat it for "tea," which is dinner (which in parts of the US is known as supper), others say pie is what you eat when you're coming home from the bar. On this trip so far, it's been the go-to food when jet lag makes my stomach growl at odd hours outside of normal meal times.

Hand pies are served warm, the filling is soft and gooey gravy, and the crust is always flaky. And they are almost always savory, salty and hearty. (I don't even want to know the fat and calorie count!)

One of my stops was in the town of Rotorua, famous for its hot springs. It's a crazy thing to see a town built on a lake that looks more like a cauldron. Steam vents puff out columns of smoke all around the town, making for an eerie site, and the underlying concern that the whole place might blow up if the earth decided to let loose.

My NZ host, Grace, and I drove from Auckland to Rotorua on the way to her daughter's in Napier (Hawke's Bay) further south. In Rotorua, we stayed at the Ibis Hotel, where the manager rolled out the red carpet for us, upgrading our room to a lake view, throwing in a free breakfast, and then, when he heard about World Piece, he treated us to a free dinner buffet at the Novotel next door. That is some impressive Kiwi hospitality!

The buffet was a good introduction to the local cuisine, mainly fresh shellfish (oysters, mussels, shrimp), lamb shank, and their favorite dessert, a meringue/pudding combo called pavlova. After tasting the New Zealand specialty of Butter Chicken (similar to Tandoori chicken) and LOVING it --and raving about it to the waiter -- the chef came out with the recipe. His name is Rikesh and he is half Indian, half Fijian. He hand wrote out the recipe by hand for me and walked me through it, pointing out that he didn't have numbers or amounts for the ingredients. I told him, "Don't worry about it. That's how I bake!"

I'm down in Napier now and I had a butter chicken pie for lunch yesterday. It wouldn't win any pie contest. I fear Rikesh spoiled me for any other Butter Chicken. Thank goodness I have the recipe. And here it is for you.

If you're ever in Rotorua, stay at the Ibis and make sure you
have the dinner buffet at Novotel Hotel next door. And tell Rikesh I said hi.
Meanwhile, further south, in the stunning and fertile region called Hawke's Bay, I went to a Sunday farmer's market.
Hawke's Bay, New Zealand. Fertile and gorgeous, it's also one of the sunniest
places in the country. Perfect for growing grapes and apples.

It's bloody cold here in winter (yes, it's June!) so they moved the market inside.
I walked past all the hand pies for sale and migrated toward the hand carved rolling pins. Made from Tasmanian black wood and from a local New Zealand wood called Rimu, these are made from single pieces of wood. Of course I wanted to buy one, but I still have a whole world to circumnavigate and I am already over the weight limit on my luggage.
If I could have bought one it would have been hard to decide which one!
At the market I was introduced to a fruit I had never heard of called feijoa. It tastes like a cross between a passion fruit and a kiwi fruit. It's very perfumy and for that reason is best eaten in smaller doses. For example, when I tasted feijoa juice my reaction was "that's too much of a good thing." But forget the juice, you can make pie from this exotic fruit! (Exotic to me. In NZ it's an everyday fruit that grows in back yards.)


I came across the stall selling mushrooms. And at the stall was a recipe for mushroom pie.
While I was perusing the aisles for pie ingredients, Louise and Grace bought picnic supplies at the farmer's market. So after the market, Louise drove us on a scenic tour (which wasn't a stretch considering there is not one corner of NZ that is not scenic!!) and we ended up at Ocean Beach. It tugged at my heart a little to know I was looking straight back across the water to Los Angeles, where I had just left a few days earlier. A baguette, a bag of feijoa fruit and an apple pie-thing (more like a danish) made for a good snack. And the World Piece apron made for a good tablecloth!
We used the rock as a cutting board for the feijoa fruit.

Grace's daughter Louise cuts the apple pie.
Later, while browsing for pie plates at a local home goods store, I had to take a photo of this. The pie dish may look like the kind we use in the US, but when you read the recipe you'll know you're in another country. Which is the whole point of this journey. Vivre la difference!
Cloves and caster sugar. Grams instead of ounces. You can see it's not an American recipe.
Note they also suggest using a pie bird.


And the World Piece journey continues....

Coming up in my next posts: a tour of The Yummy Fruit Company apple orchards, and the first pie class I'm teaching on my round-the-world trip.


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