Thursday, January 12, 2017

The Women’s March on Washington: Just Go

Ready for Washington.
"I am woman, hear me roar."
I hate crowds. I avoid rock concerts and rallies. I shy away from situations or gatherings that might put me in harm’s way. Especially now, in today’s increasingly violent, gun-toting, backpack-bombing atmosphere, previously safe situations like going to an airport or a nightclub or a marathon have become tenuous and slightly terrifying. But when the Women’s March on Washington was announced I ran straight to my computer and booked my flight to DC. I didn’t think twice about potential danger (or the possibility of getting arrested). Nor did I even stop to think about needing a concrete reason to go. It was like a calling from a higher power. My gut feeling took over and grabbed my credit card from my purse. And before I even thought about what I was doing--or why--I had already printed out my airline itinerary.

Many of my closest friends are also flying or driving to Washington. Others are marching in other corners of the country, in LA, Austin, New York, Chicago, Portland, Park City and Des Moines. Many of them had the same instinct. “Just go.” 

But I’ve heard rumblings from other women—and from a handful of critics voicing their negativity in the media—about how there is no real mission for the march, no specific agenda. Who are the speakers? What is the unified message? What will we do once we get there? What is the purpose, the take-away? What action will come of this? This kind of response, which I deemed a little too nitpicky, made me feel sad, as if people’s need for control overrides their ability to take a chance on life.

Overthinking creates limitations. Why would you want to know all the answers before you set out on the journey? As Helen Keller said, “Life is either a great adventure or it is nothing.” If you had all kinds of pre-set expectations and objectives, what kind of adventure would it be then? Besides, expectations can lead to disappointment.

Ten years ago I heard Alice Brock from Alice’s Restaurant (yes, the one in the Arlo Guthrie song) interviewed on NPR. She was asked about the loose style of running her business and she said, “Not being locked into a ‘plan’ or a prescribed way of doing something leaves room for all kinds of wonderful stuff to happen.”

What I had remembered her saying in that interview (though oddly I couldn't find it in the transcript) is: “If I had known what I was getting into I never would have started it.”

I can think of so many times that “I never would have started” has applied to me: Moving to Germany to marry Marcus, for one. Starting a pie business in the American Gothic House, another. Traveling around the world making pie. Moving onto a farm in rural Iowa—with a farmer. And soon, marching with hundreds of thousands of women and men in Washington. The pattern is clear, the results, obvious: When you step into the unknown magnificent things can happen. I have never regretted taking a risk. Ever.

I’m all for being responsible. And careful. I don’t live entirely on the edge. I exercise. I eat my vegetables. I sleep eight hours a night. I floss (though not as often as I should.) I have health insurance (for now.) I look both ways before crossing the street (both literally and figuratively.) But above and beyond anything else, I honor and follow my guiding forces: my heart, my gut, trust and faith.

In “My Life on the Road,” Gloria Steinem writes, “If you find yourself drawn to an event against all logic, go. The universe is telling you something.”

But someone else—someone I have great respect for—put it in even more succinct terms. (No, not Oprah.) It was Barack Obama who, in his eloquent farewell speech, said, “Show up. Dive in. Stay at it. Believe that you can make a difference. Hitch your wagon to something bigger than yourselves.”

To my mind that “something bigger” is community. Community is the foundation for the even bigger stuff: Democracy. Equality. Women’s rights. Human rights. And if showing up in the nation’s capitol to create a community, to demonstrate just how much those values mean to me--to so many of us-- then, agenda specifics or not, I’m there.

The journey of a thousand miles begins with the first step. So on January 21st at 10:00 a.m., bundled up in my down jacket and my hand-knit pussyhat, I will lace up my marching boots and add my body—and my voice—to a sea of humanity as it moves along Independence Avenue. I will go with the belief that just showing up is the first step to making a difference. I will stay positive that it will be a peaceful, safe event. And more than anything, I will stay open to the adventure and all the great new friendships, ideas, power, unity and community that is sure to come from the experience. 

I hope you will join me!


RESOURCES:
Women's March on Washington website
Sister Marches in other cities
Knit or sew your own Pussy Hat
Buy your America Needs Nasty Women gear

9 comments:

Queenie said...

I had a very similar response, though I'm arriving on bus rather than air. See you there.

Therese Kiser said...

Beth,

Great column. My thoughts exactly. My decision to book a flight was very similar. If I had thought about it any longer, I would not have done it. It is going to be great! I cannot wait to participate!

Therese

D McKinnon said...

Thanks for going and representing those of us who are unable to be there!

NiesGirl said...

Madison, WI - Beth, you forgot that one. The 3 of us will be there AND I ordered a felt pussyhat after seeing your cute one on your cute self. XO I hope you take lots of pictures to share. Be with you in spirit at another capitol city. <3

Brenda said...

I'm joining you, Pie Sister, in Phoenix!

ce8d632a-647c-11e3-94d3-000bcdcb2996 said...

BOYCOTT AMERICAN WOMEN!

www.BoycottBitches.com

I am an American man, and I have decided to boycott American women. In a nutshell, American women are the most likely to cheat on you, to divorce you, to get fat, to steal half of your money in the divorce courts, don't know how to cook or clean, don't want to have children, etc. Therefore, what intelligent man would want to get involved with American women?

American women are generally immature, selfish, extremely arrogant and self-centered, mentally unstable, irresponsible, and highly unchaste. The behavior of most American women is utterly disgusting, to say the least.

This blog is my attempt to explain why I feel American women are inferior to foreign women (non-American women), and why American men should boycott American women, and date/marry only foreign (non-American) women.

Beth M Howard said...

Dear BoyottBitches, It sounds like you must have been hurt deeply by someone you loved and for that I am so sorry for your pain. I hope you find some peace in your soul. Sending you healing thoughts. With love and kindness, Beth Howard

Jane said...

I was there! So was my husband! My husband's brother and his wife came in from Connecticut as did one of their daughters. Another came in from Ohio. A cousin came in from North Carolina and a friend came in from Florida. Several of our local friends joined us, 30-some all told. And we ran into several others at the march that we knew. Our DIL was also with us. The march was one of the best things I've ever done. I felt empowered. I am not alone. The energy was amazing. I will stay active.

Jim Wood said...

Wow! Such clarity. I love your thinking! Thank you.
Cheers, Jim